Tag Archives: Ireland

Commission Proposes Increase of EU Funds Co-Financing for Six Countires

The European Commission has proposed to increase the co-financing rates for the EU funds for six EU countries that have been affected by the crisis.

Under the proposal, six countries would be asked to contribute less to projects that they currently co-finance with the European Union. The supplementary EU co financing is designated for Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Latvia and Hungary.

The measure does not represent new or additional funding but it allows an earlier reimbursement of funds already committed under EU cohesion policy, rural development and fisheries. The EU contribution would be increased to a maximum of 95% if requested by a Member State concerned. This should be accompanied by a prioritisation of projects focusing on growth and employment, such as retraining workers, setting up business clusters or investing in transport infrastructure. In this way level of execution can be increased, absorption augmented and extra money injected into the economy faster.

It concerns Member States that have been most affected by the crisis and have received financial support under a programme from the Balance of Payments mechanism for countries not in the Euro area (Romania, Latvia and Hungary) or from the European Financial Stabilisation Mechanism for countries in the Euro area (Greece, Ireland and Portugal). Bulgaria is not included in this scheme.

 

 

The Second Greek Bailout: the Details

The leaders of the eurozone have approved the second bailout of Greece that is supposed to finally overcome the debt crisis in this country. The total official financing will amount to an estimated 109 billion euro. The European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) will be used, but the maturity of the loans will be extended from the current 7.5 years to a minimum of 15 years and up to 30 years with a grace period of 10 years. Lending rates will be around 3,5%, close to the costs of borrowing for the EFSF. The maturities of existing loans from the first Greek bailout will be extended. The private sector will contribute with up to 37 billion euro. Financial institutions will be offered a set of optional forms of contribution, including the buy-back of Greek debt, the extension of bond maturities and the rollover of existing debts. Greek banks will be recapitalized “if needed”.

The EFSF and the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) will be allowed to:

  • act on the basis of a precautionary programme;
  • finance recapitalisation of financial institutions through loans to governments including in non programme countries ;
  • intervene in the secondary markets on the basis of an ECB analysis recognizing the existence of exceptional financial market circumstances and risks to financial stability.

The EFSF lending rates and maturities for Greece will also be applied for Portugal and Ireland.

So will the new bailout be effective? It’s hard to say. The economic commentators are somewhat sceptical. Felix Salmon notes that this deal is not enough on its own to bring Greece into solvency. He believes that this is not a one-off event and that the same instruments will have to be used for Portugal and/or Ireland.

It’s clear that the deal will alleviate fears for a financial meltdown in the eurozone. However, the deal does not efficiently address the growth problem for Greece (and by extension for Portugal, Ireland, Spain, etc.). The fundamental problem of the eurozone persists. Until we manage macroeconomic imbalances and structural impediments to growth, we will not be able to overcome the reasons for the current debt crisis.

 

 

Commission Proposal for a Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base

UPDATE: There is a good analysis by four economists in VOX on the impact of the proposed reform. They conclude that it is unlikely that the introduction of the Consolidated Corporate Tax Base would bring significant benefits to the EU in aggregate in terms of employment, GDP or efficiency.

The plans for a common consolidated corporate tax base are not new. However, the Commission has now stepped forward to formally propose the text of a new directive that should introduce a common corporate tax base in the EU. This is one of the measures recently identified in the Pact for the Euro.

The proposal will allow companies that have business activities in different Member States to consolidate their financial results, and to offset the profits in one country against the losses in another, and pay taxes on the net amount only. This is supposed to decrease compliance costs especially for SMEs. However, a recent report by Earnest&Young shows that there will be an average increase of 13% in compliance costs. The report also showed that the impact of the CCCTB apportionment factors was to move taxable profit into Member States with higher tax rates, thus increasing the total tax burden. Some Member States are also opposed to the idea. Unanimity is needed in the Council for adopting such legislation.

Whither New Stress Tests for European Banks?

The European Commission is calling for new stress tests for European banks. The reason? Well, it appears that the previous stress tests during the summer failed to spot huge problems at the heart of Ireland’s financial institutions.

Oli Rehn is quoted saying that Ireland’s banking meltdown was a one-off case that would not be repeated elsewhere in Europe. Well, I disagree.

Back in July I noted that stress tests must also include really worst-case scenarios, as in worst-case scenarios. Worst, not best. And all of them. We know that summer stress tests failed to do that. Now we are led to believe that the new stress tests will do the job. That is unlikely.

The problem is analyzed very well by Richard Field. He claims that there is only one way to restore trust and erect a firewall against contagion. Governments must make the statement about which banks are or are not solvent in their system and make the asset-level data available to support it.

Trichet States the Obvious

The President of the ECB, Jean-Claude Trichet, has called for a “quasi-budget federation” in front of the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee of the European Parliament. The “f” word, however, is ominously missing from the EP’s press release. Mr. Trichet went on to say that “pundits are tending to underestimate the determination of [EU] governments”.

The determination of EU to rescue the euro notwithstanding, things continue to look bad. The interest rate spread between Italian bonds and benchmark German Bunds have come to a euro-lifetime high. Belgian 10-year bonds spread to German bunds of similar maturity widened to the highest levels since at least 1993. In other words, markets are not buying the “determination” stunt, at least for now.

Hence Mr. Trichet’s comments. He is quite aware that in the long term the current institutional framework of the eurozone is NOT sustainable. Even if the ECB manages to calm the markets for the moment (which is by no means certain), new, more powerful crises may follow in the next decade, vastly undermining economic growth in the whole European Union.

So Mr. Trichet is doing two things. First, he is trying to calm the markets, which is a very sensible thing to do. Second, he is telling European politicians that the complacency on the eurozone institutional framework is no longer possible and discussions must start now. Now the question is are they listening?

 

 

The Irish Bailout: the Details and the Bigger Picture

The details of the Irish bailout are now set:

EU countries and the International Monetary Fund will provide up to €85bn in total, which may be drawn down over a period of up to 7½ years. About €50bn is aimed at bolstering Ireland’s public finances while it implements a €15bn austerity package over the next four years. Of the remaining €35bn, €10bn will be used to recapitalise Ireland’s stricken banks, while another €25bn will be a contingency fund to help support the banking system if necessary. The Irish government itself will contribute €17.5bn towards the bank contingency fund, while the IMF will put €22.5bn towards the overall package. This will also include three bilateral loans from the UK, Sweden and Denmark, with the British contribution being around €3.8bn. Ireland will pay average interest of 5.8 percent on the loans.

More importantly, the Council agreed on speedy introduction of a permanent European Stability Mechanism (ESM). An ESM loan will enjoy preferred creditor status, junior only to the IMF loan. The most important feature are the so-called collective action clauses (CACs). These clauses allow a large majority of bondholders to agree a debt restructuring that is legally binding on all bondholders. CACs are meant to ease the process of debt restructuring. The CACS will be introduced in mid-2013.

The proposal for ESM is supported by the president of the ECB, Jean-Claude Trichet. The president of the European Council, Herman van Rompuy, will present proposals for amendment of the Treaties in December.

There is, however, a problem. The financial markets seem unconvinced. As Eurointelligence notes, the problem is that the market demand for peripheral debt is weak, and from 2013 demand for peripheral bonds may dry up completely due to the bail-in rules. And the 6% interest on bailout loans may be too high for Ireland to stay solvent.

There are some ideas how to handle this. Wolfgang Münchau proposes to separate national debt from financial debt and to turn all outstanding sovereign bonds, existing and new, into a common European treasury bond. He does admit that his proposal is not actually feasible, though.

So a more practical approach is to see whether, after all, the EU rescue system can survive the waves of uncertainty. Spiegel International does just that, and notes that of all the possible next bailouts, one is a no-brainer. If Spain falls, so does the euro.