The Irish Bailout: the Details and the Bigger Picture

The details of the Irish bailout are now set:

EU countries and the International Monetary Fund will provide up to €85bn in total, which may be drawn down over a period of up to 7½ years. About €50bn is aimed at bolstering Ireland’s public finances while it implements a €15bn austerity package over the next four years. Of the remaining €35bn, €10bn will be used to recapitalise Ireland’s stricken banks, while another €25bn will be a contingency fund to help support the banking system if necessary. The Irish government itself will contribute €17.5bn towards the bank contingency fund, while the IMF will put €22.5bn towards the overall package. This will also include three bilateral loans from the UK, Sweden and Denmark, with the British contribution being around €3.8bn. Ireland will pay average interest of 5.8 percent on the loans.

More importantly, the Council agreed on speedy introduction of a permanent European Stability Mechanism (ESM). An ESM loan will enjoy preferred creditor status, junior only to the IMF loan. The most important feature are the so-called collective action clauses (CACs). These clauses allow a large majority of bondholders to agree a debt restructuring that is legally binding on all bondholders. CACs are meant to ease the process of debt restructuring. The CACS will be introduced in mid-2013.

The proposal for ESM is supported by the president of the ECB, Jean-Claude Trichet. The president of the European Council, Herman van Rompuy, will present proposals for amendment of the Treaties in December.

There is, however, a problem. The financial markets seem unconvinced. As Eurointelligence notes, the problem is that the market demand for peripheral debt is weak, and from 2013 demand for peripheral bonds may dry up completely due to the bail-in rules. And the 6% interest on bailout loans may be too high for Ireland to stay solvent.

There are some ideas how to handle this. Wolfgang Münchau proposes to separate national debt from financial debt and to turn all outstanding sovereign bonds, existing and new, into a common European treasury bond. He does admit that his proposal is not actually feasible, though.

So a more practical approach is to see whether, after all, the EU rescue system can survive the waves of uncertainty. Spiegel International does just that, and notes that of all the possible next bailouts, one is a no-brainer. If Spain falls, so does the euro.

 

 

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